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What is USCIS Form I-90, and what is it used for?

Form I-90, also called “Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card,” is provided by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for Green Card holders to replace their expiring or lost Green Cards. Learn how it’s done.

Screenshot of I-90,Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card (Green Card)

Who needs to file Form I-90?

Out of ten different reasons to renew a Green Card, eight require I-90, Application to Replace Permanent Resident Card (Green Card). These are:

  • Your Green Card of 10 years validity is about to expire
  • Your Green Card of 10 years validity has expired
  • You lost your Green Card
  • You changed your gender and/or name
  • You never received your Green Card (though it was issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DOS))
  • Your current Green Card has errors that the DOS made
  • You have an old version of a Green Card with no expiration date
  • You are turning 14 years old, and your current Green Card will expire before your 16th birthday

The two cases left are related to marriage or investments and involve other USCIS forms to remove the permanent residence conditions (Form I-751 and Form I-829).

Required documents for an I-90 application

When filing for a Green Card replacement, you need to provide the following documents along with your I-90 petition:

  • Your current Green Card (if possible)
  • Your passport or equivalent
  • Evidence and supporting documentation, e. g. a birth certificate
  • Other documents, depending on your case
  • Copies of all documents requested
  • Translations of the requested documents in case they are written in a foreign language

How to fill out Form I-90

When completing the form by hand (e. g. in case you need to apply for a fee waiver at the same time), use black ink, write neat, readable, and within the given space. Don’t highlight or paint over your writing because USCIS is using scanners.

Write your name, date of birth, and Alien Registration Number (also A-Number, USCIS #) on all pages. If you have nothing to state, fill in “N/A” for text fields or “0” for number fields.

During your application process, you will go through the following steps:

  1. If you want to file I-90 online, create a USCIS online account.
  2. Download the latest available version of the I-90 form on the USCIS website.
  3. Read the latest available instructions to learn about required evidence in your case, exceptions and waivers, and the guidelines for payments.
  4. Complete Form I-90.
  5. If filling out by hand, double-check your signature and send the form to USCIS. You will receive a confirmation as soon as they started the process.
  6. Pay your fees.
  7. Provide additional information (if required).
  8. Go to your biometric services appointment (if required).
  9. Appear for an interview (if required).
  10. Receive the decision on your case.

You can keep yourself informed about your case status using your USCIS online account.

Note: If you have questions during the process, call the National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 for the most current information. For TTY (deaf or hard of hearing), call: 1-800-767-1833.

How much does Form I-90 cost?

The standard fees for your I-90 petition vary depending on your case. Here’s an overview of the different circumstances and expected costs:

Type of renewal Filling Fee Biometrics Total costs
Standard replacement of a Green Card $455 $85 $540
Green Card renewal within 30 days of turning 14 years when your current card will expire before your 16th birthday no fee $85 $85
Filing when your Green Card was issued but you never received it no fee not needed -
Filing when your current card has errors made by the Department of Homeland Security no fee not needed -

When do I have to apply for my Green Card replacement?

According to the USCIS instructions for the I-90 process, you should not apply earlier than specified. Here are the current timelines:

Reason for Green Card repalcement Time to apply
Standard replacement of a Green Card (lost or stolen) Immediately
Green Card is about to expire Earliest six months before the expiration date
A child turning 14 years when their current Green Card will expire before their 16th birthday Within 30 days after a child reaches 14 years of age
Your Green Card was issued, but you never received it Immediately
Your current Green Card has errors made by the Department of Homeland Security Immediately
Infographic showing the issue date and expiration date of a Green Card

Is your Green Card expiring? Then you can apply for a replacement six months before at the earliest.

Processing time for Form I-90

The time range for I-90 applications varies depending on your case. It can be between six to ten months. You can check the current case processing times under https://egov.uscis.gov/processing-times/.

What happens after filing I-90?

After you filed Form I-90, USCIS will send you a “Form I-797 Notice of Action” as a receipt. This letter proves your Lawful Permanent Resident status until your new Green Card is issued. Therefore, carry I-797 with you at all times as if it were your Green Card.

Can my Green Card replacement be denied?

USCIS can deny your I-90 petition. If this is the case, they will inform you via a decision letter. Possible reasons for an I-90 denial are:

  • You committed a crime
  • You lied in your I-90 petition
  • You failed to complete I-90 according to the instructions
  • A judge decided that you should be deported
  • You used the wrong form (e.g., I-751 or I-829 instead of I-90)
  • You applied too early
  • You stayed outside of the USA for too long (more than a year)
  • You have not paid your taxes

Does I-90 require an extra interview?

USCIS might invite you to an additional interview or biometrics appointment after you filed the I-90 petition. These appointments can involve a background and security check and a check of your criminal history.

Do I need a lawyer for the I-90 Application?

You usually don’t need a lawyer when filing Form I-90. However, if things get complicated, it might help consult an attorney to avoid your removal from the USA.

Sources:

uscis.gov